Turn, Turn, Turn

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We haven’t had any more snow, but are definitely at the height of Indian Summer.

With the start of cooler evenings (40s and below) the trees have started their Fall display, and what a display it is!

These are maples in the backyard.  The red one is Autumn Blaze, I think.  Tree names are not my specialty.

While maples are generally thought of as the showiest of trees in the valley, the ashes definitely hold their own.

This one marks the corner of the house, and looks rather festive next to the plum.  I wonder what their conversation is?

“Hey Plum!  When do you turn colors?”

“I don’t.  I’m colorful all year long!”

Even the crabapple tree is getting into the act.  And that wire cage on the right?  That’s to protect the rose ground cover from the rabbits.  We did some shrubbery and flower planting a couple months back, only to find that we unexpectedly put out a “Free Lunch” sign for the rabbits.

Yes, some of them are cute little bunnies that don’t eat much, but others are big jackrabbits, who I am sure belong to a gang and wear black leather jackets.

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Last Day of Summer

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Yesterday was the first day of Fall, which made Thursday the last day of summer.  Usually that’s a chance to do one more outdoorsy, sunshiny traipse through fields type of outing.

Not so much.  Instead, we woke up to snow.  Snow on the mountains.  What started out as a dusting of powdered sugar in the morning turned into some very wintery conditions as the day progressed.  Rain.  Wind.  More Rain. Did I mention rain?  Rain at elevation turned to snow.

I’m hoping this is another good year of snow pack.  We still need the water.

Style Arc: Laura

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So, with the retirement of the Cat’s Pajamas, I went looking for a new nightshirt.  Nothing worked.  Most of the jammies the local stores carried were just not right – the fabric was too cheap or the style was too, dare I say it, young?

Anyway, while trolling through the fabrics at Emma One Sock I came across this lovely, and knew I had found what I was looking for.

I would sew my nightshirt.

It’s a digital print from the Netherlands, with the elephant on one side, and the zebra on the other.  The fabric is a beefy cotton knit, with a touch of lycra to keep it stretchy.

One panel was just long enough to make a nightshirt – provided the binding and sleeves were cut from something else.  There is plenty of white rayon knit in the stash that would work.

Using a regular t-shirt pattern would be too form-fitting to sleep comfortably.

Style Arc’s Laura pattern then came to mind.  The pattern has a yoke front and back, but I could easily merge those pieces, which I did.  I omitted the center back seam too.  No need to have a seam up my zebra!

I am unbelievably tickled with this sleepwear solution.

Cute, comfy jammies!  Oh, did I mention I gave the goose a sparkly crown.

 

Cat’s Pajamas

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This nightshirt was a birthday gift from a good friend ages and ages ago.

I dare say it’s probably close to 20 years old?  Maybe a bit less.  Perhaps a bit more.

Either way, it has seen it’s fair share of wear.  Worn to the point that it’s time to retire it.  Not that it will be donated to charity.

Oh no!  There are too many lovely memories attached.  It will be folded and gently stored in the wardrobe drawer reserved for “special” things – handmade socks, the dress I wore to meet Santa when I was three.  You know – those keepsakes you just have to keep.

Unfortunately retiring the Cat’s Pajamas leaves a definite gap in my pajama selection.

What to do?  What to do?  What to do?

A Triscuit

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A Tasket
An Eclipse Viewing Basket

Ok, so it doesn’t exactly rhyme; it was the best I could do.  Here in the mountains of Northern Nevada we did not have totality, but at 80% it was still worthwhile.

Waiting to the last minute, I sacrificed a Triscuit box, not having any cereal to hand.  Worked out just fine.  Also helped that the Internet was awash with “How-To” on making safe viewing devices.

Alas, our local library was one of the ones bit by the scurrilous, and had to issue a Do Not Use warning for the glasses they had passed out the week before.  Their supplier was unable to verify that the glasses were indeed, eclipse proof.

I had a great time wandering around outside, seeing the crescents through the leaves of the trees, as well as my cracker box.  The light changed so distinctively, as did the temperature.  I could well understand prehistoric peoples thinking the end of the world was nigh.  It’s a very primal feeling.

Also evident was that I work with a group of geeks, as nearly every single person on the inter-company messaging app showed “away” as the eclipse neared.  I could literally watch it move across the country based on when people were available, and when they weren’t.  Which may not have been so good for company productivity, but I thought it really cool that so many people were interested in science.  Especially when it comes knocking on one’s front door.

McCalls: 7472

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Not quite fabric scraps, the grape printed challis was barely a yard, acquired from the ASG Garage Sale back in May.  I walked past the bundles of fabric, trailing my hand along then stopped when I touched this one.  Ohhh!  Score!

It’s an old-style challis.  One of the softer more fluid ones.  The accent fabric on the sleeves and collar are also from the garage sale.  It’s a sueded challis in a bluish grey color.  The photo above doesn’t do the colors justice.  They are much more saturated in real life.

The pattern is a new one for me.  I liked the raglan sleeves so I wouldn’t have to worry about lining up a shoulder seam to my non-aligned shoulders.  I added a pleat to the back for a bit more fullness.

Otherwise there were no pattern alterations.  The sewing was very direct.  Sew seam.  Overlock seam.  Next!  I used Louise Cutting’s method for attaching the collar band.  She has a great tutorial on doing this which cuts down on bulk and insures the curves match.

Once the weather cools down, I plan on wearing this with grey leggings.

Give a Hoot

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I saw these little ceramic owls in the discard pile at the local bead shoppe (aren’t all bead stores a shoppe?) and knew they deserved better.  They were just laying there, asking for some passer-by to please give a hoot about them.  That was me.  Hoot!  Hoot!

They were so full of color and personality they didn’t need much to make them soar.

I pulled the primary colors of the spiral focal from the owls – bright red, mauve and baby blue.  The rest of the necklace is a lovely dove grey which compliments the brightness of the owls.  I’m not enough of a bird watcher to know if owls and doves coexist in the wild, but in beading they certainly do.