Category Archives: Sewing

Jalie 968: Shorts

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As has been previously mentioned, it’s become quite warm here. Warm enough that more shorts are in order.  The current batch in the dresser have truly seen better days.  Stained.  Stretched.  Torn.  and otherwise abused.

It was time to make more.  These are from fabric acquired I-don’t-remember-where, which is apparently a store I frequently shop, because I have acquired a lot of fabric from them.  It’s mostly cotton, which makes it perfect for warm weather.

The pattern is my TNT pants from Jalie, alas long out of print.  The sewing was pretty straightforward.  I even remembered that the seams are 3/8 rather than 5/8 inch, which corresponds the width of a 4-thread overlock.

For once, I’ve finished apparel appropriate to the season, and should get a lot of wear out them.

Style Arc: Violet

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It’s over 100 degrees outside, which means I am indoors working on a jacket made from felted fleece.  For Winter.  Yes indeed, sports fans, I am once again working at cross seasons, sewing something totally unsuited to now.

There is one redeeming factor with this project, that being I started the jacket at Sewing Camp in April, when there actually was snow on the ground, and I could have worn it.

Several iterations of trial and error on the finishing method delayed the actual completion.

The original plan was to use a faux leather as the binding, creating high contrast with the felted fleece.  The faux leather did not cooperate.  Next I tested a more mundane edging, which made things look too generic.  The primary fabric really did need something with equal pizzazz.

The winner was a black organza binding, which of course was a #($&#?@ to sew.  Slippery?  Yes.  Ravelly?  Yes.  We agreed to disagree, and it was hand sewn into submission (and readers of this blog know how much I hate to hand sew garments).  In fact, this jacket has more hand sewing than I have done on any garment in years.  Years.  Decades.

There were a ton of things I did differently from the pattern recommendations.  The Violet pattern suggests using a stable knit like ponte.  I did not do this.  The pattern does not have instructions for making the jacket reversible.  I wanted it to be reversible, so both side of the primary fabric would be usable.  The pattern does not have directions for having pockets on both sides if you do decide to make it reversible.  Lastly, the edges are supposed to be turned under and stitched.  And of course, I did not do this.

Given all these deviations from the pattern recommendations and suggestions, I don’t feel I can easily say how good or bad the pattern itself is, since I basically thumbed my nose at it.  All I can say is “I did it my way”, and in the end, it worked.

As you can see from the above photos, one side is a lovely marbled grey and the other a colorful riot of felted ribbons.  Both sides have usable pockets which do not connect internally.   It took a bit of thought, as well as a lot of hand sewing to get everything lined up and working properly.

The organza binding was hand sewn to the garment.  And since I was hand sewing, why not make it even more interesting by adding beads?  So I did.

Now that all is said and done, I think the organza and beads add just the right elan.   Perhaps even more than the faux leather would have done.

Now I look forward to cold weather.

Penchant for Pods

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I’ve been looking for sewing projects that would use up all the bits and pieces of fabrics I’ve accumulated.  You know those fabrics you like too much to toss, even though there’s not enough left to make a pocket lining.

I stumbled on these critters while cruising Craftsy, looking for ideas or patterns or… something!

These little cuties were just the ticket!

The instructions are very good, including how to create a franken-zipper of your very own.  That means separating a zipper and removing the zipper head on purpuse which is something I had issues with.  It’s one of the Seven Deadly Sewing Mistakes – zipping a zip only to come completely off the teeth.  Eek!

These little pods are about 4 inches on a side.  Large enough to hold whatever may need holding, but small enough to not be cumbersome.  Some of them are stiffened with quilt batting (more scraps put to good use) while others have heavy duty interfacing.  I haven’t yet decided which I prefer.  Both support media allow them to stay open when unzipped.

Two 10 inch (or smaller) pieces of fabric create two pods.  Not bad!  I can see these as gifties for the holidays.

Style Arc: Lotti, Lotta Lotti

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As the weather turns warm (let’s not count that cold spell from last week, where the mountains got snow) thoughts turn to easy breezy attire.

Another rendition of Style Arc’s Lotti in the last of what I’ve taken to calling the “stoplight” fabric.

There was enough fabric to adjust placement so another wardrobe faux pas didn’t occur, but beyond that not a scrap was left.  The fabric stash unearthed a complimentary ponte to use as the second third.

Second third?  Hey, look at the pattern: 2 distinct fabrics, separated by thirds.  Second third.  Shhh!  Don’t tell Strunk & White.  That’ll be our little secret.

Sewn on the serger.  Hemmed on the cover stitch.  Worn by Moi!

Vogue 1412: Borders

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Started at sewing camp.  Completed at home.

Vogue 1412 in a lovely border-print silk crepe.  Even better, the fabric was from last year’s ASG garage sale!  Woohoo!  Like Goldilocks, there was just enough for this blouse.

It’s been a very long time since I’ve made a formal woven blouse.  Not that this blouse is for formal occasions, far from it, but that it involved more formal sewing skills.  A cuff.  A cuff placket.  Shawl collar.  Gathers.

And of course being silk, the need to finish all the interior edges  appropriately.  As nice on the inside as is is on the outside.

Expecting to wear the top over leggings, I lengthened it about 2 inches.  I also cut it on the cross grain, to make full use of the lovely floral border.

Floaty Flowery Fabulosity!

Jalie 968: Genera

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There is not much to say about this sew, other than with summer on the way, the jeans I’ve been wearing all winter were getting a tad tatty.  Time to sew up another pair.

Enter grey something-or-other fabric (cotton and X the unknown) from the local mill end fabric store.  A pattern that I don’t have to fit.  A Sunday afternoon with nothing scheduled.

Result:  a new pair of pants.  Yay!

Just the Necessary

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This is my rendition of the Necessary Clutch Wallet from Emmeline Bags.  It is apparently taking the wallet sewing world by storm.

Our sewing guild had this as their March workshop, and I was able to finish it at sewing camp.  It’s a great way to use up all those bits and pieces you have left over from other projects.  That quilting cotton with the To-Die-For print?  Use it here!

The workshop was great!  All the bag hardware was included in the class fee, as well as various stiffeners and interfacing.  This is a structured bag.  It does not collapse when chock full of all those essentials required on a daily basis.

It is also the only project I finished at sewing camp.  I attribute that to the fact that my sewjo was off somewhere drinking fruity drinks at the time.  She does this periodically, and never checks with my agenda.   Pretty nervy!

The inside is just as colorful, which I really like.  Zippered pockets.  Credit card pockets.  Slip pockets.  An open, but secured pocket which holds up to an iPhone 7 (not that I have one of those).

Speaking of, why is it handbags no longer come with credit card pockets?  I mean, really?  In a world that is almost completely cash-less these days, and nowhere to slip those cards.  Harrumph!

Bright.  Useful.  Cute.  Ta-Da!