Tag Archives: woven

Style Arc: Autumn

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I wanted to try out this pattern the instant Style Arc released it.  But the thought of paying shipping from Australia to the US for one pattern caused the financially responsible me to call a halt to such notions.

Patience paid off, as it was eventually available on Amazon US, and on sale.  <Insert pat on back>.

The fabric is a lovely cotton seersucker that was a gift from dear friend Earin.  I’ve quite a few things made from it.  Washes and wears well.

Typical of Style Arc, the instructions are minimal.  A couple of line drawings to show where the pleats are supposed to go and you’re on your own.

It’s a simple pattern, though not for the raw beginner.

Changes were to double up on the back  yoke, and relocate the pockets.  I love pockets, but these must have been designed with a Glamazon in mind, as they were a good 2 inches lower than my hands.  I have long arms too!

So, the pockets were raised.

I cut two of the yoke, knowing full well that would make hemming the edge of the armhole a bit complicated.  The yoke was sewn so that the seams were all inside, with an armhole seam allowance turned under on both the yoke and body pieces.

Umm, I’m not saying that very clearly, but there you go.

I put snips into the seam allowance to mark how the back pleat was to be sewn, but when it came time to actually line them up, they made no sense to me.  I winged it, making sure there was the same length of non-pleased fabric at each end.  That is one deep pleat, so I don’t think exactness is a concern.

It’s a cool and comfy pattern.  Not so loose that one feels enveloped in fabric, not so snug that you can’t have fries with lunch.

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Cutting Line Designs: Butterfly and Bees

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At the end of every year, our sewing guild holds a holiday gala.  A traditional part of the gala is the fabric swap.  Fabric of a length suitable to become a garment or quilt is placed in a sealed bag.  Numbers are drawn, and guests have the option of choosing a new bag, or stealing from another member.

It’s a great way to re-home one’s wonder fabric (as in, I wonder why I bought this?) as well as acquire something completely different.

Many folks will go to great lengths (pun intended) to secure their treasures.  Who’s that hiding under the table?  What did you stuff in your backpack?

To insure our newly acquired treasures don’t languish, the April meeting is a “Wear What Ya Won” event.  Everyone who attends brings whatever it is they made from their prize.  Some folks become very creative!

This was my fabric prize (full disclosure – I was one of the few people to “steal” from someone else – I am ruthless when it comes to fabric).  It’s a slubbed boucle type of fabric, completely washable and very loosely woven.

While it is jacket-weight, it would have required more manipulation than I was willing to do for this material to become a structured garment.

Enter Butterfly & Bees from Louise Cutting.  It’s an older, out of print pattern, but worked perfectly.  There was a coordinating printed polyester in the stash.  I decided to Go For It!

The one pattern is cut twice.  Both jackets are assembled separately, except for the neckline.  Then the two pieces are joined at the neckline only.  This allows the interior fabric to hang freely and peek out all around the edges.  To give more weight to the side vents, I stitched antique glass buttons at the top.

The jacket is perfect for summer evenings here.  Once the sun goes down, there can be a definite chill in the air.

McCalls: 7472

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Not quite fabric scraps, the grape printed challis was barely a yard, acquired from the ASG Garage Sale back in May.  I walked past the bundles of fabric, trailing my hand along then stopped when I touched this one.  Ohhh!  Score!

It’s an old-style challis.  One of the softer more fluid ones.  The accent fabric on the sleeves and collar are also from the garage sale.  It’s a sueded challis in a bluish grey color.  The photo above doesn’t do the colors justice.  They are much more saturated in real life.

The pattern is a new one for me.  I liked the raglan sleeves so I wouldn’t have to worry about lining up a shoulder seam to my non-aligned shoulders.  I added a pleat to the back for a bit more fullness.

Otherwise there were no pattern alterations.  The sewing was very direct.  Sew seam.  Overlock seam.  Next!  I used Louise Cutting’s method for attaching the collar band.  She has a great tutorial on doing this which cuts down on bulk and insures the curves match.

Once the weather cools down, I plan on wearing this with grey leggings.

Jalie 968: Shorts

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As has been previously mentioned, it’s become quite warm here. Warm enough that more shorts are in order.  The current batch in the dresser have truly seen better days.  Stained.  Stretched.  Torn.  and otherwise abused.

It was time to make more.  These are from fabric acquired I-don’t-remember-where, which is apparently a store I frequently shop, because I have acquired a lot of fabric from them.  It’s mostly cotton, which makes it perfect for warm weather.

The pattern is my TNT pants from Jalie, alas long out of print.  The sewing was pretty straightforward.  I even remembered that the seams are 3/8 rather than 5/8 inch, which corresponds the width of a 4-thread overlock.

For once, I’ve finished apparel appropriate to the season, and should get a lot of wear out them.

Vogue 1412: Borders

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Started at sewing camp.  Completed at home.

Vogue 1412 in a lovely border-print silk crepe.  Even better, the fabric was from last year’s ASG garage sale!  Woohoo!  Like Goldilocks, there was just enough for this blouse.

It’s been a very long time since I’ve made a formal woven blouse.  Not that this blouse is for formal occasions, far from it, but that it involved more formal sewing skills.  A cuff.  A cuff placket.  Shawl collar.  Gathers.

And of course being silk, the need to finish all the interior edges  appropriately.  As nice on the inside as is is on the outside.

Expecting to wear the top over leggings, I lengthened it about 2 inches.  I also cut it on the cross grain, to make full use of the lovely floral border.

Floaty Flowery Fabulosity!

Style Arc: Avery Spotted

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The last(for a while) rendition of Avery is finished!

This was one of those endeavors that percolated for a while, then waited longer for fabric to arrive, then waited again for Ms. Mojo to return.  It seemed to take forever, and I suppose it did.

Anyway, the first fabric was the floral print, which turned out to be way too sheer to use on it’s own.  I thought to line it with a white lining until the idea of plain white morphed into spots, which lead to the under layer.

I lengthened the polka-dot under-layer about 1 1/2 inches, so it peeks out the bottom.  The top and sleeves are a bright white rayon knit.  No changes to the sewing, other than the two woven pieces are only connected at the top; they are free floating in the rest of the garment.  This gives a nice swish to everything.